Cleveland Bishop Dedicates St. Sebastian Parish Historic Renovation


The $1 million restoration of St. Sebastian church in Akron, Ohio led by
Perspectus Historic Architecture: Chambers, Murphy & Burge Studio
is now complete. The restoration project marks the 90th anniversary of St. Sebastian Parish, established in 1928.

To kick off the celebration, Bishop Nelson Perez of the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland, celebrated Mass and the dedication of the restored church (c. 1960) on Saturday, June 30th. Joining Bishop Perez was the parish’s pastor, Father John Valencheck; pastor emeritus, Father William Karg; and parochial vicar, Father Anthony Simone.

Posted by Saint Sebastian Parish on Monday, July 2, 2018

The project included cleaning the carved and ashlar stone at the front façade all the way to the bell tower. The St. Sebastian shield just under the peak of the roof has been conserved, reviving its finishes and the gold trim was patched with new leaf. A new wheelchair ramp has been added to access the main entry.

The granite front steps are restored, and the plaza is expanded and repaved with porcelain pavers in a pattern that resembles the ceramic tile pattern at the church entry.

One of the most impressive parts of the project is the magnificent tesserae mosaic behind the altar. The tiles were cleaned, patched, replaced those that had fallen off, and the matrix restored. The lighting that shines on the mosaic was updated to show off its beauty.

Posted by Saint Sebastian Parish on Thursday, June 14, 2018

The ornamental bronze and brass work on both the interior and exterior of the church was conserved with Renaissance wax to improve and protect its natural color.

Over 10,000 square-feet of terrazzo floor has been refinished.

All 113 pews and kneelers were taken offsite where the anachronistic finishes added throughout the years were stripped and the pews restored to their original finish.

The funds for the project were raised through St. Sebastian Parish’s capital campaign, “Cornerstone of our Faith,” launched last May.

Shaping Today’s Laboratories for the Future

Whether testing patient specimens or developing life-saving medical advancements, laboratories play vital roles in healthcare systems. Healthcare providers depend on laboratories to deliver the best possible patient care. Patients depend on laboratories to provide doctors with the proper information for diagnosis and treatment.

It is important that the design of these complex facilities best serves these functions, allowing for maximum utility of the space. Laboratory design varies immensely from project to project, but one aspect is universal: the design must serve today’s needs and adapt to changing demands over time.

Perspectus Architecture delivers expert programming, planning, and project implementation for clinical, research, and educational lab clients. Utilizing cutting-edge design and leveraging our technical capabilities, we understand the relevant issues facing labs today. Our specialized knowledge of common trends in automation, equipment, staff productivity, and workflow helps us address each lab’s unique challenges and provide efficient, sustainable environments that provide value over time.

Clinical Labs

Clinical lab processes prioritize output and efficiency in delivering information to healthcare providers. Clinical lab design emphasizes creating an environment that facilitates the maximum performance of each lab’s unique operating procedures and processes.

Designing for process and flexibility

Leading trends in the design of clinical labs focus on increased automation and lean workflows. It is vital that labs can evolve with implementing continuous improvements in their processes.

Cleveland Clinic Robert J. Tomsich Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Institute (PLMI)

We design flexible spaces to accommodate for future growth, processes, and technological advancements. Perspectus took this long view when designing the Cleveland Clinic’s Robert J. Tomsich Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Institute (PLMI), completed in 2011. Now years later, the building is accommodating proposed renovations as it was designed to do – with flexibility in responding to lean workflow improvements and an increase in testing volume.

Cleveland Clinic Robert J. Tomsich Pathology & Laboratory Medicine Institute (PLMI)

Designing a space that allows for expansion of automation to process and analyze rising numbers of patient specimens increases efficiency, minimizes mistakes, and reduces repetitive manual work.

“A big trend in all the clinical labs is automation. It is a robotic system where you send the sample through and multiple tests can be done on it. The results are shown via computer; it’s not just individual technicians running the tests,” says Vlad Novakovic, Principal and Laboratory Studio Lead at Perspectus Architecture, “It’s less hands, all automated.”

Another key focus in lab design is implementing lean principles and practices. One example of this is designing labs to minimize steps and eliminate waste so that the workflow is as efficient as possible.

Waste is defined as anything not adding value to a process. For example, if a workspace requires a technician to take an extra step when they only need to turn and grab something, our design process to eliminate those extra steps that are a source of “waste.”

Primary Clinical Laboratory for Health Network Laboratories – Lehigh Valley Health Network

This was particularly important when Perspectus was designing a new primary clinical laboratory for Health Network Laboratories in Allentown, PA. Tasked with converting an old call center into a clinical laboratory, we spent time meeting with the users to thoroughly understand their workflow processes. This informed the design of the new space that is optimized for their workflows and the elimination of wasted steps. For instance, the departments with the highest volumes are positioned closest to incoming specimens. A robot moving on a carefully planned path distributes specimens efficiently without interrupting lab technicians.

Research Labs

While clinical labs are directly tied to current patients, research labs are linked to cures and medical advancements for future patients. Through thoughtful, rigorous design, Perspectus Architecture is creating spaces where doctors and researchers can investigate new treatments and cures for diseases.

Designing for flexibility and collaboration

Trends in research lab design are centered on creating spaces that allow for flexibility and improve collaboration among departments.

Many institutions are hindered by the inefficiency of decentralized spaces – various departments conducting similar research, but spread out across different buildings or floors.

“As they’ve grown into their facility over several years, they’re realigning departments with a common research focus.  This also means reallocating spaces to right-size their needs as research labs grow and contract,” says Bradley Fink, Project Director at Perspectus Architecture.

Perspectus is working with our lab clients to bring researchers together while also providing common spaces with shared, centralized equipment universal to their research. Designing the environments to be flexible based on the ever-changing needs of researchers is critical. For example, while the sink and walls are in a fixed position, benches or ceiling electrical outlets can be reconfigured to accommodate other research or equipment.

“There is a focus on re-organizing based on types of research, but also grouping like-minded researchers in direct proximity. Shared common space promotes more interaction, more collaboration and can accommodate more research,” says Novakovic.

This focus on creating spaces that can evolve over time and foster interaction ultimately provides more efficient operations and has the added benefits of increased collaboration. As leaders in cutting-edge laboratory design, we plan for spaces that will help our clients provide the highest quality care to patients today and tomorrow.

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Designing for USP 800: Creating A Safe Healthcare Environment

Exposure to hazardous drugs – such as those used in cancer treatment, antivirals, hormones, and some bioengineered drugs – can put healthcare workers at serious risk of adverse health effects. These can include impact or damage to DNA, cancer, infertility, birth defects, and organ damage, to name a few.

In February 2016, The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) released USP Chapter 800, “Hazardous Drugs – Handling in Healthcare Settings,” to address these risks. Chapter 800 outlines a strict set of standards on the handling of these drugs in hospitals and the design of clinical pharmacies to minimize risk. This poses several design implications for the space planning of pharmacies to achieve compliance.

Meeting the deadline

Facility modifications will need to be implemented before the USP 800 effective date in December 2019, placing pressure on hospitals to act now. Our design team is experienced in USP compliance and healthcare design and can help these facilities reach USP 800 compliance by the defined date.

Perspectus Architecture works with top healthcare institutions improving and reconfiguring their pharmacies to ensure that the environment is designed to meet requirements of USP 800.

Our first step is a site evaluation of the physical space by creating a compliance checklist or gap analysis. Then we speak with the users about their workflow and processes.

“We talk to the pharmacists and pharmacy techs that live in the space to identify where improvements can be made with their workflow and processes,” says Ray Minotas, Project Director at Perspectus Architecture. “That will then impact the overall design and layout while also making sure that all USP 800 guidelines are met.”

Key facility improvements

The new engineering and environment control/quality requirements apply to unpacking environments, preparation and compounding cleanrooms, and storage spaces.

“Previously, non-hazardous and hazardous drugs could be received and unpacked in the space. Sterile and non-sterile hazardous drugs could also be stored together in positive pressure – this is no longer allowable,” says Sal Rini, Principal at Perspectus Architecture.

Pharmacies are now required to have separate cleanrooms – one for sterile non-hazardous, and another for sterile hazardous, with an anteroom between them for access. The receiving and unpacking areas for hazardous drugs must now be under negative pressure with at least 12 air exchanges per hour to assist in the ventilation of potentially harmful gasses or residue.

One of the most challenging aspects of these upgrades can be finding the space within the existing facility to accommodate hazardous drug unpacking and storage rooms adjacent to the compounding room.

Minimizing Public Health Risks

It is important to reiterate that the design modifications expressed in USP 800 are the response to the growing concern of dangerous health risks that can result from the exposure to the over 200 hazardous drugs during receiving and handling in healthcare settings. The design of a new pharmacy will vary widely on a case-by-case basis, depending on the existing conditions of the pharmacy. Perspectus Architecture works closely with hospitals to ensure the least impact possible to their facilities and to maintain full compounding operations.

Perspectus Congratulates Three Newly Licensed Architects

Pictured Left to Right: Chris Dohar, Natalie Shellhorn, Tyler Middendorf

June 2018 – We are so proud to announce that Chris Dohar, Natalie Shellhorn, and Tyler Middendorf have recently accomplished all requirements to become officially licensed architects! Throughout their journeys, Chris, Natalie, and Tyler have succeeded in each stage of qualification, including passing all divisions of the Architect Registration Exam.

Congratulations to each newly licensed architect!

 

 

Welcome (Back) Interns Sam Losi and Katie Wills

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Pictured: Sam Losi and Katie Wills

We are excited to welcome (back) architectural intern Sam Losi and interior design intern Katie Wills to Perspectus for the summer.

Sam previously interned with Perspectus over his winter break this past year. He just completed his first year at Carnegie Mellon University where he is studying architecture.

Katie also previously interned with Perspectus over her winter break. She is a rising senior at Kent State University where she is majoring in interior design and just completed her spring semester abroad in Florence, Italy.

We thought it would be a good idea for everyone to get to know Sam and Katie a little bit, so we did a Q & A with them.

What about architecture/interior design gets you excited?

(Sam) I really enjoy the idea of my future work ‘living’ longer than I do. Someday I want my grandchildren or great-grandchildren to walk into a space I designed and think to themselves “My Pop-pop made this.”

(Katie) There are so many things about interior design that excite me. Mainly all of the possibilities that this field has to offer. I am interested in sustainable design and green design because there is still so much to be discovered. With new innovations in interior design being developed all of the time, it is an exciting time to be in the field. I really enjoy and get excited about being able to change people’s lives and help people visions become a reality.

Who is your favorite architect/interior designer?

(S) My favorite architect is Louis Kahn. I recently had the chance to visit Rochester, New York and, while there, was privileged to experience the interior spaces of the First Unitarian Church of Rochester. The monumental feeling conveyed by Kahn in the church’s congregational hall has stuck with me.

(K) I don’t have one favorite architect or interior designer. But I just got back from studying abroad in Florence, Italy and the architecture was incredible. It was fascinating to see all of the structures and details that are still intact today. It seemed like everywhere you look there is something to see and it is amazing how innovative the designers were and it was all hand built.

What have you always wanted to try and never did?

(S) I have always wanted to try to fly a plane. As a little kid, the giant flying machines amazed me and I’ve dreamt of flying one ever since.

(K) I have always wanted to go on a hot air balloon ride or go bungee jumping.

What is the one thing you can’t live without?

(S) My cats. I have had at least one as long as I can remember, and they have a special place in my heart. Angel, the elder of the two, is 18 years old and is blind and deaf. Patches, the younger, is 8 and really fat. They’re great.

(K) I can’t live without coffee or tea. I drink one or the other all day long.

Anything else we should know about you?

(S) I almost always have interesting socks on. I started collecting them a few years ago and it has gotten to the point where it takes longer for me to decide what pair of socks to wear than it does what shirt. It’s a bit quirky, I know.

(K) Interesting fact- I collect coffee cups. Also, I love to skydive and paraglide

Perspectus Promotes Four and Hires One

May 29, 2018 – Perspectus Architecture has recently promoted four team members and hired one.

Natalie Ata has been promoted to Director of Marketing.

McKensey Seher has been promoted to Marketing Associate.

In addition to his role as a Senior Project Director, Eric Lahrmer, AIA, NCARB, has also been promoted to Director of Architectural Operations.

In addition to his role as a Project Director, David Thompson, AIA, LEED® AP BD+C, NCARB, has also been promoted to Director of Design.

Additionally, Perspectus welcomes the third Natalie on our team and second Natalie in our marketing department, Natalie Pike. Natalie has joined our marketing department as our Communications Associate. Welcome, Natalie P!

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Perspectus Project Wins Award At Celebration of Preservation

Perspectus Project for City of Massillon Honored With Excellence in Preservation Education Award

May 23, 2018 – Perspectus Historic Architecture, Chambers, Murphy & Burge Studio, was recognized last night at the Celebration of Preservation hosted by AIA Cleveland and the Cleveland Restoration Society for their work on Design Guidelines for the Massillon Downtown Historic District. The project won the award for Excellence in Preservation Education.

Perspectus-Architecture-Massillon-Design-Guidelines

Principals Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, Larry Fischer, and Peter Bohan attended last night’s event. Design Guidelines provide citizens and property owners with the historical context of their community and illustrate the types of buildings that represent the city’s unique past and instill a sense of pride. The Guidelines highlight different types and styles of buildings found in the community and describe the historic values, influences, and features that are associated with each. Describing proper maintenance of historic materials, the Guidelines provide helpful information to property owners on metal work, brick and stone masonry, windows and doors, and roofing and rainwater systems.

For more on Design Guidelines, click here.

 

Perspectus Completes Cleveland Clinic Crile Building Food Emporium

Perspectus’ latest project for the Cleveland Clinic is now open to the public.

As the architect of record, Perspectus provided design services for architecture and interiors, construction administration and coordination of engineers and equipment vendors.

Perspectus designed the 17,000 square-foot dining space consistent with the Cleveland Clinic’s branding and philosophy of creating environments free of clutter and distractions, making it a peaceful and relaxing place for patients, their families and Clinic staff to eat. The facility boasts abundant natural light and views of the surrounding neighborhood with large floor to ceiling windows on three sides of the space. The Food Emporium delivers a retreat from the otherwise stressful experience of being in a hospital.

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The Food Emporium supports the Cleveland Clinic’s efforts to provide healthier food. Working in collaboration with Bon Appetit Management Company, a food-service management company with a focus on local, sustainable food sources, the redesigned space features six neighborhoods of food. Each concept delivers fresh, wholesome options using whole grains, minimally-processed meats, and an emphasis on locally-sourced the ingredients whenever possible.

One of the six neighborhoods includes the first Beefsteak location in the Great Lakes region. Beefsteak is a vegetable-forward restaurant chain led by James Beard Award and Michelin Star winner, Jose Andres.

Other concepts include:

Starbucks: Third location on the campus
Char: Burgers and sandwiches
Italia: Flatbreads
Carve: Mediterranean / Hummus Bar
Simmer and Steam: Vietnamese Pho

Check out more of our work in healthcare here.

Read The Project Feature in Properties Magazine

Senior Living Architect Eileen Nacht joins Perspectus Architecture

Perspectus Architecture is pleased to announce that Eileen Nacht, AIA, LEED AP, EDAC, one of the region’s leading senior living architects, has joined the full-service architectural firm as Senior Project Director.

Senior Project Director Eileen Nacht

With more than 25 years of experience, Eileen is a seasoned architectural professional who manages concept, design, budgeting and development for multi-million dollar clients. Her portfolio includes complex, multifaceted projects specific to senior living, encompassing the full continuum of care, including master planning for new construction and renovation of existing communities. Eileen has worked with senior living communities in Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Florida as well as several VA Medical Center Community Living Centers.

Supervising projects from concept design through post occupancy, Eileen is committed to expanding Perspectus’ capabilities and applying an evidence-based process to the design and development of healing environments for senior living and healthcare.

“We continually strive to attract the best talent, and Eileen excels in leading architectural and engineering project teams,” said Jim Wallis, AIA, IIDA, NCARB, Principal of Perspectus Architecture. “We’re thrilled to have her on board to elevate our programming process for all project types, especially those focused on person-centered care.”

A resident of Pepper Pike, Ohio, Eileen earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from University of Cincinnati and is a registered architect in the State of Ohio. A member of AIA, Eileen is a LEED Accredited Professional and holds Evidence Based Design Accreditation Certification (EDAC).