Tag Archives: Perspectus Staff

5 Minutes with Perspectus Architecture’s Historic Studio

May is National Preservation Month! To celebrate, team members from our historic studio share their insights to questions like: What is the purpose of historic preservation? Why should developers prioritize the reuse of old buildings? What are the biggest challenges facing historic preservation today?

Continue reading to learn answers to those questions and more, including a paranormal experience.


Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA
Principal

What role does technology play in preservation?


Alice Sloan, Associate AIA
Historic Preservation Specialist

How did you end up specializing in historic preservation?

My parents instilled a love of history in me from a very young age. I grew up vacationing in the southern United States touring historic sites and battlefields and developed an appreciation of historic homes in particular.

What is your historic place to visit?

What do you think is the purpose of historic preservation?

What can we learn from tragic burning of the Cathedral Notre Dame Paris?

Thorough documentation in the form of photographs and measured drawings is essential for our most significant buildings. 3-D laser scanning and photogrammetry should be utilized.


Brian Broadus, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Senior Project Director

How did you pick up the practice of architecture in historic preservation?

What is the project you’re most proud of?

What role does technology play in preservation?

What’s the most interesting story you uncovered about a project that you worked on?

An infirmary from 1858 led me into scientific literature surrounding the miasma theory of disease and taught me about Florence Nightingale and the origins of professional nursing.

I also bumped into the last known photograph of Edgar Allen Poe and the man who took it.

Last known photograph of Edgar Allen Poe photograph
Image courtesy of Brian Broadus, AIA

What are the biggest challenges in preservation today?


Sean Stewart
Interior Design, Preservation

What is the project you are most proud of and why?

What is your favorite historic place to visit?

What do you think is the purpose of historic preservation?

The purpose of Historical Preservation is to preserve sites, structures, or districts that had an impact on history. To me, it is the practice of preserving and rehabilitating old historic structures so that they are economically stable in today’s world.

Why should developers prioritize the reuse of old buildings?


Dalton Kline
Interior Design, Preservation

How did you end up specializing in historic preservation?

What is your favorite historic place to visit?

It’s a tie between New Orleans and the basement of any historic building. I love New Orleans because it is a true blending of dissimilar and potent cultures.

I love basements because they are often the last thing altered in a historic building. So, that means that they are often the closest thing to original left in a building. Basements are dirty, cold, damp and dark. It’s the absolute best place to go.

Have you ever had a paranormal experience working on a project?

What do you think is the purpose of historic preservation?

To preserve history to ensure the survival and growth of our heritage.

What is your vision for the future of the historic preservation movement?

Why should developers prioritize reuse of old buildings?

Because age is an asset, not a hindrance. Viewing age as a hindrance makes for terrible design and a disappointing life.

What can we learn from tragic burning of the Cathedral Notre Dame Paris?


Martha Ross, RA
Senior Project Director

What is your favorite historic place to visit?

Copenhagen as the city has maintained most of its historic fabric by re-purposing the interiors and by doing so has maintained the character of the city from the past but promoted the usefulness of the city for the present.

What is something new you learned this week?

A Johnson Glass House + a Wright Overhang + a 1960’s Fleischman school entrance does not = a compatible addition to a 1889-1922 building!

Why should developers prioritize the reuse of old buildings?

What can we learn from the tragic burning of the Cathedral Notre Dame Paris?

Perspectus Welcomes Summer Architectural Intern Robbie Eberhart

Perspectus Architecture - New Hire Intern - Robbie Eberhart

May 2019 – We’re excited to welcome our new summer architectural intern, Robbie Eberhart, to the team!

Robbie is a rising senior of the Kent State University Class of 2020 where he studies architecture. We asked Robbie five questions to help everyone get to know him.

What about architecture excites you?

The fact that a field of study and work can influence so many people in such dynamic ways is inspiring.

The part I find most interesting is the ability to positively affect the communities involved with the projects. Not often does everyone get a chance to impact people’s lives directly every day, but architecture is the perfect medium to allow your creative interests and ideas improve the people you work with.

Who is your favorite architect?

I don’t have a specific favorite architect; however, my favorite architecture firm is Diller Scofidio and Renfro (DS + R). They do very interesting work and their design process uses amazing graphics and figural strategies that inspire the work I hope to do one day.

What are you looking forward to as you begin your internship here at Perspectus?

As I take my first step into learning about becoming a professional architect, I am excited to learn about how a firm interacts with clients, and how many different ways you can work on design in a firm environment.

I am interested in the relationship between architecture and people, so I hope to learn all I can about how the design process works by joining the client and firm relationship together to tackle a project.

I am also interested to learn about all the design strategies and modes explored in the professional setting. You can only learn so much in the academic setting, so I hope to be exposed to the many ways I haven’t seen yet.

What do you hope to do after you graduate?

After I graduate with my bachelor’s degree in Architecture, I intend on pursuing a dual master’s degree in both architecture and business. Kent State University offers a dual mastery program that I hope to accomplish.

After I finish school, I want to work somewhere that I can have a lasting impact on the communities I serve, and maybe one day open and run my own practice.

People would be surprised if they knew…

People would be surprised if they knew that I care about superheroes more than my well-being. I follow Marvel Comics unconditionally, and I could tell you anything about the Marvel Comic Universe that you want to know.

My favorite marvel hero is “Iron Man”, but my favorite superhero in general is “The Flash” (from DC Comics). I don’t own any physical comic book collections, but there are digital collections online that I follow and subscribe to.

Elizabeth Corbin Murphy_Perspectus-Architecture_Notable-Women-in-STEM

Principal Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA, Recognized as 2019 Crain’s Notable Women in STEM Recipient

February 2019 – Perspectus Architecture is proud to announce that our own Principal Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA, has been selected as a 2019 Crain’s Notable Women in STEM. In addition to being incredibly well-deserved, this recognition is also particularly significant as architecture was just recently added as an official STEM Subject as of July 31, 2018.

Congratulations, Elizabeth! Thank you for your leadership and mentoring both within our firm and in the architecture industry.

The article below was originally published in Crain’s Cleveland Business.


Elizabeth Corbin Murphy
Principal, Perspectus Architecture

Most recent education: Master of architecture, Kent State University

Elizabeth Corbin Murphy develops processes and technologies to evaluate structures and materials so they may be authentically restored and renovated.

In addition to navigating the merger between her firm, one of the oldest women-led architectural practices in Ohio, with Perspectus Architecture, she is also a professor of practice at Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Kathleen Crowther, president of the Cleveland Restoration Society, said Corbin Murphy is a renowned heritage architect throughout the Midwest.

“Elizabeth is a leading advocate for excellence in urban planning, retrofitting of existing buildings, sensitivity in design so that it can lift the entire community, and, of course, the restoration, rehabilitation and preservation of historic buildings,” Crowther said.

Corbin Murphy also is known for her veracity.

In 2015, she was named Woman of the Year for Integrity by the Summit County Women’s History Project and earned the American Institute of Architects Ohio Gold Medal in 2014. She also serves on the board of directors for the Great Trail Council, Boy Scouts of America.

“We can have confidence in the wise, thoughtful and courageous voice she brings to the often-challenging issues of the day. Her moral commitment to do good is unparalleled,” said Terry Welker, AIA fellow and chief building official for the city of Kettering.

Originally published in Crain’s Cleveland Business.

Adam-Yaracs-AIA-Young-Architects-Award_Perspectus-Architecture

Adam Yaracs, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB Receives 2019 AIA National Young Architects Award

February 2019 – Perspectus Architecture is proud to announce that Project Manager Adam Yaracs, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB has been selected by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) as a recipient of the 2019 Young Architects Award. This prestigious award honors individuals nationwide who have demonstrated exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the architecture profession early in their careers and within the first 10 years of achieving licensure. Adam will be presented with the Young Architect award on June 6th at the 2019 AIA National Conference on Architecture in Las Vegas and will be featured in February’s issue of Architect Magazine.

“To be selected as a recipient of the AIA National Young Architect Award is an overwhelming honor. Being recognized by the College of Fellows and by your peers as a leader and as someone who has made significant contributions to the profession is humbling,” says Adam.

He continues, “To me, receiving this award reinforces the importance of becoming a multifaceted professional and stresses the value of giving back to the profession. Using the many individuals who have mentored me through the early stages of my career as an example, this award exemplifies my commitment to continue to practice thoughtful, sustainable architecture, lead by example and mentor young professionals and the next generation of leaders.”

Nominated by the AIA Cleveland Chapter, this honor speaks highly of Adam’s continued commitment to the profession and his initiative as a leader within the design community. These qualities are demonstrated through Adam’s involvement in the AIA Cleveland Chapter, as an educator at Kent State University, a mentor to architecture students and young professionals, and within our own team at Perspectus designing outstanding work for our clients.

“This is exciting news. I couldn’t be prouder of the accomplishments Adam has achieved,” says Managing Principal and Perspectus Architecture founder Bill Ayars, AIA, ACHA. “This is a well-earned honor and I’m extremely proud of his success.”

Adam’s career has advanced at a rapid pace since his start as an intern architect. He humbly admits that his experiences working at several respected national and local design firms have greatly influenced his career trajectory. At each of these firms, his creativity, high design intelligence and keen ability to understand the client have made him a highly valued team member. Adam has played a key role on many AIA design award-winning projects including a university social sciences center, a performing arts center and music education building, and most recently, the Gleneagles Golf clubhouse and community center in Twinsburg, Ohio to name a few.

The Gleneagles Golf clubhouse and community center earned the People’s Choice Award in the architecture category at the 2018 AIA Cleveland Design Awards.

Motivated by designing community spaces

Creating spaces that build community is the overarching design philosophy that Adam strives to apply in all his work, regardless of project type. A community can be identified by its people, and the buildings that they work, live, and play in. Responsible architecture that provokes the importance of the human experience will promote a community’s identity and health.

To Adam, thoughtful design that strengthens the community and enhances the quality of life is the responsibility of all architects – and everyone is worthy of it.

“My goal is to introduce and practice good design principles to each project, independent of who the client is, the project type, or the budget.”

Building community through mentorship

Helping to shape his success are the handful of mentors Adam feels fortunate to have in his life and professional career. Those mentors include: Steve Kordalski, AIA, Jack Bialosky Jr., FAIA, Robert Maschke, FAIA, Aaron Hill, AIA, Tim Hawk, FAIA, Jodi van der Wiel, AIA, Larry Fischer, AIA, Bill Ayars, AIA, Dave Robar, AIA, Allan Renzi, AIA, and Charles Belson, AIA.

“I have always been surrounded by strong team members and mentors who have played an enormous role in supporting me and offering career advice,” he says.

He credits his mentors who encouraged him to get involved with the local design community at an early stage of his career and to pursue his desire to teach.

Because of the positive and fruitful relationships he has had with his own mentors, he now chooses to share his knowledge and experiences by educating and mentoring young students at his alma mater, the Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design. He emphasizes that the choice to become a mentor is the one of the most important decisions a design professional can make in his or her career.

“My mentors have supported me through milestones such as graduate school, achieving my architectural license, leading the local design community as AIA Cleveland President, and pursuing career opportunities,” he recalls.

“To be able to navigate these challenges and to find some level of success in your own career, encourages and motivates you to help those who are just beginning to pursue their own journey to become a design professional. Teaching at Kent State University has provided me with a platform to do just that,” where he teaches a First Year Foundations design studio, a Professional Practice Portfolio workshop, participates in the scholarship review committee, and leads as the faculty advisor to the American Institute of Architects Students (AIAS) Kent State Chapter.

A leader in the design community

Adam is heavily involved as a leader in the design community through his involvement with AIA. In 2017, at just 34-years-old, Adam served as the AIA Cleveland Chapter President. As President, he led key communication initiatives like the implementation and expansion of a weekly e-newsletter, increasing the chapter’s social media presence, adding a storefront projection system to the chapter office, and creating a new chapter website.

During his term, the chapter experienced record growth in chapter development and membership. He worked with board members to establish the annual AIA Cleveland Kent State University Scholarship Fund and worked with the University to increase student participation and inclusion within the chapter. In addition, Adam chairs the annual Design Cruise Line networking event and the Cleveland Design Awards where he has continued work to grow the awards program to include over 500 attendees.

Continuing his leadership for AIA Cleveland after his presidency, Adam was elected in 2017 to a two-year term as the Director of Communications.

Because of this unrelenting dedication and service to the architecture community, he has been recognized by AIA Cleveland with several individual awards. Adam was honored with his first Presidential Citation in 2011, the Chapter Activism Award in 2013, and was just honored with a second Presidential Citation at the 2018 AIA Cleveland Design Awards.

The 2019 AIA National Young Architects Award is only the latest addition to his growing collection of achievements.

Only the beginning

If the last 10 years are any indication, Adam shows no signs of slowing down. We at Perspectus Architecture are so proud to see Adam recognized with the AIA Young Architects Award and to have him on our team.

Congratulations, Adam!  We can’t wait to see what you do next. 


To read the article published by AIA National on Adam’s selection as a recipient of the 2019 Young Architects Award, click here.

Principal Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA Appointed Regional Representative to AIA College of Fellows

November 2018 – Perspectus Architecture Principal Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA has been appointed as one of two Ohio Valley Regional Representatives to the AIA College of Fellows for 2019.

As Regional Representative, Murphy will serve as a liaison between the AIA Fellows within the Ohio Valley region and the AIA College of Fellows. This esteemed role encompasses four objectives: Generate awareness; Encourage participation among existing Fellows; Inspire professional growth among recently licensed Architects through fellowship within the Institute; and Influence AIA components (disseminate messaging and information about the College.

Congratulations, Elizabeth!

Perspectus-Architecture-New-Hire-Gwendolyn-Frank

Perspectus Architecture Welcomes Gwendolyn Frank to the Team!

Perspectus-Architecture-New-Hire-Gwendolyn-Frank

Perspectus Architecture is proud to welcome our newest team member, Gwendolyn Frank! She recently graduated from Kent State University with a Master of Architecture. She joins us as an intern architect and hopes to one day be a proud pet-parent for the world’s largest (perhaps cutest?) rodent, the capybara.

We thought we would introduce her with a short Q&A to help everyone get to know her.

Where are you from originally?

I grew up in Westerville, Ohio, but have lived around different parts of Ohio.

What’s your favorite thing to do outside of work?

Exploring a new place or having a new experience is something I value greatly.

Who or what inspires you most?

Family has always been a large source of my inspiration.

What are you most excited about as you begin your career?

I am most excited to continue learning, and specifically learning in a professional setting. School and the profession offer quite different learning opportunities.

If I weren’t an architect I would be….

I never had a backup option, but I suppose it would have something to do with art and history.

What’s the coolest place you’ve ever been? Where do you want to travel to most and why?

I was fortunate to travel to Italy during school, and my most memorable moment was sitting overlooking the city from the Florence Opera. I could see my next big adventure being Barcelona to see Sagrada Familia.

Favorite TV show/movie?

Movies, I enjoy old Hollywood films and for TV I am happy when a new season of Project Runway starts.

Is there something not many people know about you?

I have an affinity for unique animals and really would love to have a capybara someday.

Capybara

via Giphy

The age-old Cleveland question: East Side or West Side?

I live on the East Side but more often on the West Side in my spare time.

Cavs or Indians?

Indians for sure!

Dogs or Cats?

Dogs. I grew up fostering puppies for the humane society and hope to have a chance to sometime in the future.

Welcome to the team, Gwendolyn! We’re so glad to have you here!

Perspectus Architecture Summer 2018 Interns

Our Summer Interns Share Their Experience at Perspectus Architecture

Perspectus Architecture Summer 2018 Interns
Perspectus Architecture’s 2018 summer interns, Sam and Katie.

To many, the end of August marks the bittersweet goodbye to summer and the perennial return of Pumpkin Spice everything. It also marks the conclusion of Sam and Katie’s summer internship at Perspectus Architecture. Sam and Katie impressed us all with their hard work and determination. We’ll miss seeing them both every day in the office, but Katie will still be joining us every Friday!

But before they returned to their respective halls of ivy – Sam at Carnegie Mellon and Katie at Kent State – they took some time to share some thoughts on the experiences they had as interns at Perspectus Architecture.

Here’s what they had to say:

Sam – Architectural Intern
Sophomore, Carnegie Mellon University

This internship was my first “work-world” experience. So naturally, I really didn’t know what to expect on my first day. After coming in, introducing myself, and finding out what I would do, I began learning how to use Revit. After gaining a basic understanding, I was able to contribute to projects (such as Paramount Senior Living and Laurel Lake Senior Living). The work was rigorous yet satisfying.

I really appreciated the times I was able to gain first-hand experience of on-site interactions. It allowed me to gain an understanding into the client-contractor-architect relationship.

Over the few months that I interned at Perspectus Architecture, I became more comfortable with myself in the office environment and definitely became better at time management. I got myself on a sleep schedule and actually planned out my weeks in advance so that I would be able to accomplish at-work tasks while having enough time to be a college kid afterwards.

This summer was also my first experience with a daily work commute, so I feel like I’ve gained some important and possibly life-saving insights into the minds of rush hour drivers.

Though I did enjoy my time at Perspectus, I’m immensely excited to return to school and looking forward to applying what I’ve learned to broaden my knowledge of the architectural practice and enhance my education.

I’d like to thank everyone who supplied me with the opportunities to work on projects, were patient enough to mentor me, and encouraged me to struggle through unfamiliar work to involve myself this summer.


Katie – Interior Design Intern
Senior, Kent State University

During my summer internship experience at Perspectus, I was fortunate enough to experience and learn many new things. Throughout the summer I have had the opportunity to work on many projects. I was able to work and assist different architects at the firm on a variety of projects that were all at different stages.

One of the best parts about this experience was that there was never a dull moment or even a ‘typical’ day. There were always new projects or tasks to be tackled. My favorite days were when we had AIA and IDCEC Lunch & Learns. It was always interesting to learn about new products and innovations happening within the industry; and the lunch was always a delicious bonus!

This opportunity has allowed me to meet new people and develop professional skills that will help as I continue my education and professional career.

This summer has given me an insight into the professional world and a sneak-peek into what my career could potentially be like, which is very exciting.

Everyone in the office was extremely welcoming and kind and I am truly grateful for all the people at the firm; especially my mentor – Christina Litchney.